Viganò’s Third Testimony Responds to Ouellet, Appeals to Judgment Before God

By Steve Skojec, October 19, 2018

It is striking the way in which Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò has become, in many ways, the kind of hero the Church is so desperately looking for. Today, on the occasion of the Feast of the North American Martyrs — Jesuits who, unlike many of the modern-day variety, gave their lives for the salvation of souls — he has released a third testimony. And with each iteration he becomes more resolute, and the force of his accusations grow stronger. He is a man who speaks with the authority of one who has foregone earthly accolades and benefits in a genuine concern for the answers he will have to give at his particular judgment. It is a theme he has referenced before, and does so again, more forcefully, in his opening paragraph:

To bear witness to corruption in the hierarchy of the Catholic Church was a painful decision for me, and remains so.  But I am an old man, one who knows he must soon give an accounting to the Judge for his actions and omissions, one who fears Him who can cast body and soul into hell. A Judge who, even in his infinite mercy, will render to every person salvation or damnation according to what he has deserved.  Anticipating the dreadful question from that Judge — “How could you, who had knowledge of the truth, keep silent in the midst of falsehood and depravity?” — what answer could I give?

While promises of a formal correction from Cardinals Burke and Brandmüller have fizzled and faded, and talk of a self-deposing pope have disappeared from their public commentary, Viganò’s clear, firm voice has become like a clarion call: the pope must “admit his errors, repent, show his willingness to follow the mandate given to Peter and, once converted let him confirm his brothers (Lk 22:32).”

In his latest testimony, which we publish in full below, Viganò principally dissects the public response he received from Cardinal Marc Ouellet, affirms what most commentators have already observed — that Ouellet “concedes the important claims that I did and do make, and disputes claims I don’t make and never made” — and repeats his call for the Canadian cardinal, and any who have the documentation that would help make the facts known, that they can choose to continue in falsehood, or “trust Him who told us, ‘the truth will set you free.’”

“I do not say it will be easy,” concludes Viganò, “to decide between silence and speaking.  I urge you to consider which choice– on your deathbed, and then before the just Judge — you will not regret having made.”

Viganò also re-iterates that his claims are “not gossip from the sacristy” but that “official correspondence” exists — documents that “specify the identity of the perpetrators and their protectors, and the chronological sequence of the facts.”

“They are kept in the appropriate archives,” writes Viganò. “No extraordinary investigation is needed to recover them.

He also adds his voice to the chorus saying that we are in a crisis due to the scourge of homosexuality, in its agents, in its motives, in its resistance to reform. It is no exaggeration to say that homosexuality has become a plague in the clergy, and it can only be eradicated with spiritual weapons.  It is an enormous hypocrisy to condemn the abuse, claim to weep for the victims, and yet refuse to denounce the root cause of so much sexual abuse: homosexuality.  It is hypocrisy to refuse to acknowledge that this scourge is due to a serious crisis in the spiritual life of the clergy and to fail to take the steps necessary to remedy it.

We urge the reader to consider, once again, that Viganò has given up all earthly security to make his claims known. There is no fund filling up with cash on his behalf from grateful members of the faithful. He has given up what life the Church would have provided for him in retirement in exchange for the life of a fugitive, a hunted man, unable even to finish out his remaining years in the country of his birth. What possible motive do his detractors think is animating him to repeat his claims?

“This is not a matter,” he seems to thunder, “of settling scores or sulking over the vicissitudes of ecclesiastical careers.  It is not a matter of politics.  It is not a matter of how church historians may evaluate this or that papacy.  This is about souls.  Many souls have been and are even now imperiled of their eternal salvation.”

His is a voice that rings with the unmistakable note of truth; he is the one man — the only shepherd in the Church — who has taken the example of St. Paul in Galatians 2:11 and rebuked Peter to the face, because he is to be blamed.

Please continue your prayers for Archbishop Viganò, as well as for the intention that the facts of the matters he describes herein will be brought to light swiftly, and that justice will be served.

On the Feast of the North American Martyrs

To bear witness to corruption in the hierarchy of the Catholic Church was a painful decision for me, and remains so.  But I am an old man, one who knows he must soon give an accounting to the Judge for his actions and omissions, one who fears Him who can cast body and soul into hell. A Judge who, even in his infinite mercy, will render to every person salvation or damnation according to what he has deserved.  Anticipating the dreadful question from that Judge — “How could you, who had knowledge of the truth, keep silent in the midst of falsehood and depravity?” — what answer could I give?

I testified fully aware that my testimony would bring alarm and dismay to many eminent persons: churchmen, fellow bishops, colleagues with whom I had worked and prayed.   I knew many would feel wounded and betrayed.  I expected that some would in their turn assail me and my motives.  Most painful of all, I knew that many of the innocent faithful would be confused and disconcerted by the spectacle of a bishop’s charging colleagues and superiors with malfeasance, sexual sin, and grave neglect of duty.  Yet I believe that my continued silence would put many souls at risk, and would certainly damn my own.  Having reported multiple times to my superiors, and even to the pope, the aberrant behavior of Theodore McCarrick, I could have publicly denounced the truths of which I was aware earlier.  If I have some responsibility in this delay, I repent for that.  This delay was due to the gravity of the decision I was going to take, and to the long travail of my conscience.

I have been accused of creating confusion and division in the Church through my testimony.  To those who believe such confusion and division were negligible prior to August 2018, perhaps such a claim is plausible.  Most impartial observers, however, will have been aware of a longstanding excess of both, as is inevitable when the successor of Peter is negligent in exercising his principal mission, which is to confirm the brothers in the faith and in sound moral doctrine.  When he then exacerbates the crisis by contradictory or perplexing statements about these doctrines, the confusion is worsened.

Therefore I spoke.  For it is the conspiracy of silence that has wrought and continues to wreak great harm in the Church — harm to so many innocent souls, to young priestly vocations, to the faithful at large.  With regard to my decision, which I have taken in conscience before God, I willingly accept every fraternal correction, advice, recommendation, and invitation to progress in my life of faith and love for Christ, the Church and the pope.

Let me restate the key points of my testimony.

 

Full letter at:  https://onepeterfive.com/viganos-third-testimony-responds-to-ouellet-appeals-to-judgment-before-god/