Author Martin Mosebach acknowledges that the Roman Rite today is very much a marginalized, disfavored and minority phenomenon.

Author Martin Mosebach acknowledges that the Roman Rite today is very much a marginalized, disfavored and minority phenomenon. It inhabits isolated chapels and shabby parishes supported by those without wealth or influence in Church or society. Humanly speaking, it would seem that it should disappear with the last generation to have lived it as the sole form of worship in the Western Church. Yet Mosebach’s last message to us is one of hope.

He understands that the present (“modern”) age is but a second in relation to eternity, and that the last word has by no means been spoken regarding that form of worship that uniquely corresponds to the religious nature of man. Mosebach’s convictions would seem to lead to another unstated yet inevitable conclusion: the renaissance of the Roman Rite ultimately can only be as a law for the Church, not as a concession to an eccentric minority. These reflections of the author on the future of the Roman Rite, informed by bitter realism yet calmly trusting in Divine providence, are yet another of many virtues which make Haeresie der Formlosigkeit such a rare work.